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gathering and troop inspection. >> the pentagon pulled out all stops and panetta, the defense secretary, started putting out these dire numbers, 800,000 civilian jobs at the pentagon furloughed, 20% cut in pay after he gave a very angry speech at georgetown university, within hours the panic, they put out there will only be one aircraft carrier in the persian gulf and is a big issue for the republicans. >> there's not enough, is there? >> there's been two there the past two years. chris: again, the president wants to go big picture and talk big picture and he's confronted with this. >> it's a big issue for the house republicans because there's a big division there. you've got some of the tea party conservatives saying you know what, this is the best we'll get on cuts so we're going to eat the defense cuts because the cuts are shared across the board. and there are lots of republicans, i believe, including the house speaker, who don't believe that. chris: you believe there's enough republicans who are not far right. >> it's not going to happen and i think that this gets us back to the ma
into words and the the war afghanistan and he's allowing the pentagon and you have to remember when you're looking at the pentagon you are looking at an institution that has defined motor skills and a dinosaur. if you take the pentagon a long time to put something together all but obama has to do and i know it isn't this simple but i would look at the gorbachev experience. he came out of 1985 he gave the secret speech in 1986 denouncing afghanistan to his fellow bureau colleagues as a bleeding wound he had the moxie secretly tell shultz we were getting out that the military was going to get one year to turnaround and the wouldn't feel to. they announced a timetable and they were gone. we need to do something similar. they had their chances we had 11 commanders and afghanistan in 11 years take a look at thomas rex book the generals that devotes a lot of attention to this isn't a war we can be successful and the kind of military we have. there is no military that had ever been successful in the counterinsurgency where they have a sanctuary. not only did it have a sanctuary but in outlinin
was also inducted into the hall of heroes at the pentagon and honored with a parade. since then meyer has raised more than a million dollars to help send the children of wounded marines to college. and finally, as you have all seen, he is the author of "into the fire: a firsthand account of the most extraordinary battle in the afghan war." leading authorities is very proud to exclusively represent dakota meyer, and now i want to show you a video to hear more about dakota and his story. thank you. ♪ >> it's kind of frustrating because, you know, everyone wants to get an interview about the worst day of your life. >> it was a straightforward mission that then-21-year-old sergeant dakota meyer had been assigned that day. meyer waited anxiously by the vehicles as his team began their parol of the village on foot. as they approached, all hell l broke loose. more than 50 insurgents fired from positions on mountains surrounding the valley and from within the village. back at the vehicles, meyer heard the firing and could see into the valley. the volume of fire increased, and the radio traffic
that came out recently. it did suggest the pentagon is pushing the pentagon that would only keep 8000 troops in afghanistan. i know that general austin, you weren't a part of the process so far, but can you support a plan that was scheduled withdraws troops in advance? you know, we're looking at withdraws troops in afghanistan and according to this article from a passing down to 1000 within a short period of time, i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdraw when sec previously, so much depends on the ground, what the government is doing, what variability eyes up to that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i certainly would first really work hard to make sure i fully understood with the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. certainly my advice is the commander on the ground or commander central command would provide my advice based upon breaking the security forces are and the conditions in theater and what i think we need to do to move forward to make sure we maintain the
effective in dealing inside the pentagon? >> i would worry about a congress being jammed to support a nominee that the "washington post" is said to the left of obama policy agenda and on the fringe of the senate. >> heather: joining me now is brad blakeman and erlina maxwell i'll start with you. it does appear that chuck hagel will be confirmed as secretary of defense. will this delay his performance during his confirmation hearing make him a less effective or respected secretary of defense? >> process isn't over and the delay is a caused by hagel himself. additional information was needed in his testimony. the senators have a right to review that material and use that in their judgment. assuming he is confirmed, certainly his performance before the senate was not of the caliber as anybody would thought as somebody seeking the department of defense. it was not where it should have been. he knows that. certainly the white house knows that. having said that, i think the jury out. they are going to be looking to see when she confirmed as to whether he is up for the job. really the burd
, if you will. we do have an opportunity to talk to several people within the pentagon and what we found we were very disappointed by was that they weren't taking the steps that they really needed to take to address this problem. >> brown: is this for you an act of... is it journalism? is it art? i mean it's film making. how do you see what your doing? >> well, i guess i see myself as an artist. but as an artist i think you take on the greatest challenge you can. to put all these things together, the art, film making, journalism into one, i see it as an artistic enterprise but at the same time, of course, when you're dealing with this kind of subject, you have to be very journalistically precise which we were. but it's a challenge. i mean this film was being made actually for two audiences. one was for the film making audience. it's been very successful. it was nominated for academy award. it's won many audience awards but it was also made for policy makers in washington d.c. >> brown: you had them in mind absolutely. i remember cut by cut we'd be thinking, this will play to an audience but
to continue on the washington post article that came all recently. it did suggest that the pentagon is pushing a plan that would keep only 8000 troops in afghanistan. general austin, can you support a plan that was scheduled withdrawal of troops in advance? we are looking at the withdrawal of troops in afghanistan. according to this article, from 8000 to about 1000 in a short period and of time. i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdrawal when, as you stated previously, so much depends on troops on the ground, what the government is doing, what their abilities are at that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i would really work hard to make sure i fully understood what to the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. my advice as a commander on the ground or a commander of central command -- i would provide my advice to them based upon where i think the security forces are , the conditions in the theater, and what i think we need to do to move full word to make sure we maintai
deal logical issue this is about safety and efficiency. the pentagon is behind the reductions. you want a smaller nuclear arsenal that you can be confident will work. >> countries okay you off. countries with the bomb. the u.s., russia, britain, france, china, india, pakistan, israel, north korea. countries believed to be seeking the bomb, iran,ee p egypt, nigeria, syria, taiwan. officially given up to pssing or developing the bomb, south africa, argentina, brazil, kazakhstan, belarus, ukraine, libya. >> you want to correct that buchanan? >> i don't think there are any active programs in any of those countries you are talking about except possibly iran. i don't think egypt, i don't think they have nuclear programs at all. and south africa gave up an actual nuclear weapon. libya gave up what they had inside that mountain which juan working that well. >> do you want to speak to anything? particularly iran? >> iran is going to be i just came back from the middle east, iran is going to be the issue for that part of the world. nobody is comfortable with what iran is doing at this stage of t
. as is widely recognized, sequestration over the next 10 years apply to the pentagon budget would only reduce it in inflation adjusted terms to what it was in 2007 a. the most powerful military in the world -- 2007, as the most powerful military in the world engaged in a war in iraq and the challenge in afghanistan. if members of congress pay attention to the facts, they will see a clear path to dramatically reduce pentagon spending without undermining america's position as being the most powerful nation on the planet. and nobody has done a better job of highlighting a path forward, an area of opportunity, than walter pinkus writhing on the pages of the "washington post" over the last couple years as he details the sweep of our nuclear weapons program and the spending trajectory. this morning's latest offering should be required reading for every member of congress and the ones who whine the loutest should be forced to read it -- loudest should be forced to read it twice. he details a vast array of nuclear weapons already deployed, ready to be deployed within 30 minutes, a relic of our conten
budget this year. $46 billion of that sliced from the pentagon. in addition, to the defense cuts the deadline would mean 10,000 laid-off teachers, a reduction in border patrol agents. $1 billion taken perfect relief funds ares for disaster victims and longer waits in airport screening lines of it's even threatening a nationwide meat shortage for furloughs for inspectors. >> it was requested by the president and it was his idea signed into law by h him. >> the president promised in the campaign sequestration would not happen and it's happening. >> he is getting to the $4 trillion target that economists across the country telling you that is needed to stabilize the debt. >> reporter: there are very real fears outside of the beltway that lawmakers can't and won't get a deal conin time. >> for me it's going hurt law enforcement. it's going to hurt the fbi and others. >> reporter: in new york, jane metzler, fox news. >>> in washington the white house defended president obama's immigration bill proposal wake-up to congressional efforts. >> we're doing exactly what we said we woul
-bye. and that is precisely what the defense secretary did today in his farewell ceremony. this is just outside the pentagon. he spoke about his challenges his replacement must face. >> you're going to have to continue to deal with rogue states like iran and north korea. we just saw what north korea has done in the last few weeks. a missile test and now a nuclear test. they represent a serious threat to the united states of america. we have got to be prepared to deal with that. >> deal with that, he says. panetta has been leading the pentagon for the last 18 months. but he's been in public service for the last five decades. >>> live this hour, big moment for chuck hagel, the man president obama would like to become the next secretary of defense. the senate armed forces committee holding a vote on hagel's nomination. and while it is likely he will be confirmed, several republicans, they're still putting up a fight. that happens this hour. >>> also, cereal and soda? pepsi introducing a new mountain dew drink for, dare i say, breakfast, calling it kick start. the company says it doesn't consider this an energy
's districts or you see, you know, economic fall-out from these huge cuts in the pentagon which both parties have said they want to avoid, you might see republicans open to revenue. there are republicans on the record saying that they would look at revenue to block these cuts, the sequester. john mccain said that the other day. republicans to exact a political victory here need to get spending cuts. i mean, they settled for a deal in the fiscal cliff that was not good for party leaders. they are going to hold very, very tight on that, and, by the way, after the sequester -- >> do you think that tea party response is almost sort of covering their bases there? i mean, the tea partiers get to say we had a strong message and held tight to our values. you know, these moderates went and made deals with the president. we're not to blame. if you -- in effect trying to sort of head off primary challenge if one is going to come up in 2014. >> that's the question. ran paul is playing a tough game. he has a personal history with mcconnell, who supported, you know, his challenger down there originally, a
griffin live at the pentagon with the story. >> reporter: hi, megyn, if there's one place the medal of honor recipients have in common, it's odyssey. and clinton romesha gives us that and more and become the nation's 80th living medal of honor recipients. he comes from a family of services services. he senior offed two tours in iraq and one in afghanistan. he led the defense of an out post he and 50 others soldiers were at an outpost near the pakistan border. 300 taliban overran the camp in a pre-dawn ambush that lasted ten hours and one of the bloodiest in the afghan war. eight americans killed, 22 injured and what made it unique, it was set in the bottom of a valley surrounded by mountains on all sides. its position was nearly indefensible because the taliban controlled the high ground and faced five months of nearly daily attack and slated to be dismantled by general stanley mcchrystal. he left them vulnerable in the remote parts of afghanistan. and despite a 360 attack, they called in air support and air support killed 30 insurgents and reclaimed a mortar despite a schrapnel wou
apart and obviously the optics of being out of town when there's steep cuts to the pentagon and other government programs is not great but it's really an oversimplification of the issue. >> molly, what about the plan put forth earlier this week, the $110 billion plan to avert the sequester. is that going to gain any traction? >> i doubt it. republicans have already basically said that's dead on arrival and as jake said it's not like they were getting anything done here in washington before they went on vacation. there really hasn't been any progress. there are no negotiations, nobody's talking to each other. you have these one-sided plans being put together and then they sort of get lobbed over the fence and the other side says eh, no. we're a long way from a constructive dialogue happening between the parties on capitol hill. >> jake in a piece yesterday you wrote "house republicans say if they spend the next two years like they spent the past two they'll become irrelevant." who are the most prominent republicans leading this charge toward as you put it irrelevancy? >> toward irrelev
on that "washington post" article that came out recently. it did suggest that the pentagon is pushing a plan that we keep on about 8000 troops in afghanistan. i know that general austin, you weren't a part of the planning process thus far, but can you supported plan that would scheduled withdrawal of troops in advance? you know, we are looking at withdrawal of troops in afghanistan, and according to this article from about 8000 down to 1000 within a very short period of time. i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdrawal when, as you stated previously, so much depends upon conditions on the ground, what the government is doing, what their abilities are up to that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i certainly would first really work hard to make sure i fully understood what the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. and i certainly, my advice as a commander on the ground or commander of central command, i would provide my advice based upon where i think the security forces are, a
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)